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Jim Dandy on the Platte

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Jim Dandy on the Platte

Chris Walker
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Jim Courtney
What's that on the handle bars?  A fisherman, perhaps, who missed the Fish Train?
Jim Courtney
Poulsbo, WA
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

John Greenly
Those ties must be pretty well ballasted for him to ride without shaking his teeth loose.

But seriously, somebody needs to model this, what a great scene!

John
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Chris Walker


Enlarged further, I see there appears to be Sectionmen working on the track.  I'd like to think that perhaps the Dapper Gentleman is the Station Agent returning from checking on progress made on whatever work they're doing.
UpSideDownC
in New Zealand
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Darel Leedy
Administrator
In reply to this post by Jim Courtney
Looks like he has the blueprints for the Como depot
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

John Schapekahm
oh no – no no, no no no Darel - - - please tell me you didn’t go there !!! and here I was resisting the urge to suggest maybe Chris had found the origins of the Como depot in Leadville …
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Keith Hayes
In reply to this post by Darel Leedy
You guys are so bad.
Keith Hayes
Leadville in Sn3
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

ComoDepot
Something i always wondered, why was the ballast mounded between the rails rather than level with the top of the ties?
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Chris Walker
Due in part to the correct method of hand tamping said Ballast under the Rail supporting area of the Tie depletes that area of Ballast.
UpSideDownC
in New Zealand
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

John Greenly
I was told by an old rr guy that you wanted to have the roadbed and ballast profile fall away from the ends of the ties so they weren't buried, stayed drier and didn't rot, and that the mounded ballast in the middle made a sort of a reservoir of ballast that would work its way outward under the rails to keep the profile right as time went on and the ballast tended to fall out to the sides.  Is that right?  I do notice in the old photos that the tie ends tend to be pretty well exposed on track that looks well-maintained.  

John
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Jim Courtney
That is the conventional wisdom that I've always heard.
Jim Courtney
Poulsbo, WA
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

ComoDepot
I am not saying that this is not a good reason but I have never seen it done this way elsewhere.

Is there something specific involved here?
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

John Schapekahm
This is what I've always heard = The DSP&P “native ballasted” the line, meaning it set the ties in local dirt with a few cinders mixed in. “Native ballasting” left the ends of the ties almost completely exposed, with perhaps just an inch at the ends actually in the dirt. The exposed ends of the ties allowed them to "breathe," thus drying out faster, reducing rot and enabling them to last longer. In the case of the DSP&P, they lasted a lot longer, being untreated (and thus much cheaper). The “ballast” crowned to the top surface of the ties in the centerline of the track.  In theory the “ballast” in the middle held the ties and allowed the water to drain off and away from the ties.  
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

ComoDepot
Thanks John, that makes sense.
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Doug Heitkamp
In reply to this post by Darel Leedy
Darel - LOL!
Doug Heitkamp
Centennial, CO
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Chris Walker
Speaking of another Jim Dandy, I see that his persistive efforts have now had the comments section removed from a growing number of the DPL photos.  One now has to email them with the corrections, identifications and locations.  

Well done that man!
UpSideDownC
in New Zealand
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

Keith Hayes
In reply to this post by John Schapekahm
To build on what Mr. Shapekahm states, what serves as ballast is mounded up towards the track centerline. This helps any water that falls on the road bed drain to either side of the track, moving quickly away from the road and rails, and ideally only a very small amount penetrates below the track. This prevents undermining the roadbed.

Over time, the design of the roadbed became the focus of engineers, who gradually lifted the roadbed up slightly from the adjacent landscape, tamped and compacted the underlying soil (to the extant that years of train travel did not do so), and introduced freely draining rock ballast to both bed the ties and move the water away to ditches now carved on either side of the track within the right of way.

While I enjoy nature, and like to see it preserved, all of this track engineering has created miles-long wetlands that parallel our railroads.

I can only observe that Mr. Dandy must be experiencing a bumpy ride as he spirits the depot drawings past the section gang to the next depot where an express train awaits.
Keith Hayes
Leadville in Sn3
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Re: Jim Dandy on the Platte

ComoDepot
The mound in this case seems quite flat and scraped.
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