Como Stationary Boiler

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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
Check out the roundhouse model on NGDF.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

South Park
In reply to this post by ComoDepot
  The Nesmiths are the monster-huge stacks, right ?  I too, like the time period, but
those stacks are so aesthetically out of proportion  ....  Like the tiny pancake stacks
shown in some of the Mason builder's pix ....  in that case, too small, it looks ridiculous.
Those Nesmiths remind me of the phrase:  Four foot cop with a five foot gun !  
"Duty above all else except Honor"
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
In reply to this post by Robert McFarland
There is a thread on the NGDF of an HOn3 freelance enginehouse module featuring a Como Roundhouse model complete with color photos.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
In reply to this post by South Park
Not all Nesmiths are huge-the ones on the 266Ts and the Dawson&Baily moguls were kinda medium sized.You're thinking of the ones on the Baldwin consolidations and Brooks moguls.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

South Park
  Even the Congdon stacks had some variation in profile.  Some are better looking than others.
"Duty above all else except Honor"
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Jeff Ramsey
In reply to this post by Jeff Ramsey
Photographed these 2" pipes going in and out of the floor of the Como boiler house.


And this pipe coming outside from the roundhouse from just north of where the boiler house north wall coincides with the  buttress between stall 1 and 2.


Also looks like the boiler house was plastered with cement with a inscribed or struck random rock pattern.









 
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Jeff Ramsey
I have been researching the machinery and systems from documentary and photographic observations of the Como roundhouse/machine shop and boiler house. Although this plan is pretty much rudimentary and still in progress this what I have come up with so far.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Lee Gustafson
Jeff,

Thank you for this information. I look forward to you posting more information as it becomes available. I'm building the Colorado Scale Models kit of the Como roundhouse in On3 and want to detail the interior so your information is most timely. Again, thank you.

Lee Gustafson
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Keith Hayes
In reply to this post by Jeff Ramsey
Jeff, please publish a key. I get that the walls are pale blue, and the brown squares appear to be wood columns. The grey squares are equipment (labels would help), and the boilers are obvious enough. Green are the belts and dark purple are the drive shafts. What are the pink, brown and blue pipes? And is the orange line an office at the front of the stall?
Keith Hayes
Leadville in Sn3
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
There are pipes in the back of the Roundhouse, and where the wooden extension were, coming out of the ground, not sure if they were hot water or steam. Along the back wall.

I did not realise until recently that there were at one time two boilers in there, must have been a very tight fit.

I assumed that the hole in the wall post dated railroad operations, I was told it was Cooley who did it to access the inside for his operations, may or may not be true.

Also wondered about the inspection pits, they are not that deep, you could not stand underneath very easily to work on locomotives. There does seem drainage,  would they have drained the locomotives inside?
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Rick Steele
You would absolutely want to drain the locomotives inside, especially in places like Como and Leadville.  When you drain a locomotive there is always residual water in pipe joints, elbows and fittings. Draining a locomotive outside would add to the possibility of these freezing and causing stress cracks in the castings.

Not a good idea to have a boiler check crack open under pressure, Same goes for an Injector or even a pipe elbow. Inside is the only way to go, the heater pipes inside the roundhouse will keep things from freezing and breaking.  Then you put them either on house steam (from the roundhouse boilers) or you blow out every pipe with compressed air, or you do a quick repair job and get the locomotive back on the road.

Unless it's a hot summer day, you always want to drain inside, especially in Como's case where there was a 50' turntable and the whisker tracks did not line up with each stall. There was no room for a shop goat to push and pull dead locomotives from the turntable into most of the stalls.

Rick
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Keith Hayes
What's a whisker track,  Rick?
Keith Hayes
Leadville in Sn3
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Lee Gustafson
"Excavation done by the Boulder Model Railroad club in 1986 indicates that the pits were very shallow - about two feet deep." Source Caboose Hobbies Como Roundhouse On3 instruction sheet. I've been in the pit at Knotts Berry and it was not very deep IIRC 3 maybe 4 feet deep.

Lee Gustafson
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Lee Gustafson
The pictures of Don Pacetti's HOn3 Como roundhouse on the C&Sn3 website, (they can be found on the first page under HOn3 Como layout photos) suggest a possible position of machine tools and belt routing. I found Don's work to be well thought out and executed very well.

Lee Gustafson
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Rick Steele
In reply to this post by Keith Hayes
Whisker tracks is a term that is used for a track that is located precisely across from a Roundhouse stall track so that a yard locomotive can be positioned to shove a dead locomotive into a stall. Whisker tracks are also tracks that are not as long as the Roundhouse tracks or not in a roundhouse where equipment can be positioned for long term outside storage.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Rick Steele
In reply to this post by Lee Gustafson
Lee, they're not too deep in the main line roundhouses either. You have to be able to stand up and it is usually between the frame members. If you look at the stalls in the roundhouse in Cheyenne, they are somewhere between 3 and 3.5 ft. deep. Not only did they service 4-8-8-4's there but also 3 cylinder 4-12-2's.

When we put the eccentric cranks back on the 1243 (a 4-6-0) for the 1990 Centennial Train. It was easier for me to crawl between the drivers than it was to crawl under the pilot and work my way back to the Stephenson eccentrics because the pit was too shallow.

Remember also, that the connecting rods on the DSP&P/DL&G and C&S 2-8-0's and 2-6-0's were not much larger than a good sized pipe wrench. I commented on that one time. I picked up a connecting rod from the 318 when I was working on the 3985, turned to Dirk Ramsey and said "Hell, We have pipe wrenches bigger than this". Dirk agreed. You could work on the frame of a C&S loco sitting on your butt in a pit on a Caboose Cushion.

Rick
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
Interesting, the one I remember at York you could definitely walk all the way under and have some head clearance.

last summer the issue of Como Roundhouse drainage arose mainly in connection with the Turntable Pit, seems that there is a drain and possible the drains from the Roundhouse were connected into the same pipes. I did find where I think the outlet ws, excavation would be required to confirm, about half way down the gulch. There was some indentation further down to suggest water flow but it was very minor. I would have expected to see a lot more if there wa serious flow, like a Loco being drained on a regular basis.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Don Pacetti
This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by Jeff Ramsey
Jeff Ramsey wrote
"Other interesting machinery notes include that in the late teen ICC accounting is that the horizontal duplex Knowles pump was "said to be the "property of the City of Como. This pump is listed to be resting on a concrete base. Could this be the only origiinal C&S machine tool foundation that remains today in the Como roundhouse? Was it for the generator? Or was it for some machinery in the Cooley Sawmill of the 1950s inside the former roundhouse?
Hi Jeff,
I went back and looked at the ICC Notes, and it looks to my eye like the Knowles pump you mention is listed as occupying the "Wood Frame Portion" of the roundhouse; what do you think? Based on my research the "horiz. Knowles duplex" pump, listed in the ICC notes, was actually the town's firefighting pump; its water source was the wooden tank behind the roundhouse. George Champion mentioned this pump to Forest Crossen during an interview for his Western Yesterday's Volume XI , South Park Railroaders. When the fire destroyed the final 3-stall addition to the roundhouse, in 1936, several railroad employees stated that the tank was virtually empty, as it had recently been used to fill the tender on the ready locomotive stored in the roundhouse.  As I'm sure you already know, this tank was gravity fed and leaked badly, so if this is true, the pump must have rapidly depleted what remained.  

All the best, Don
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Don Pacetti
In reply to this post by Lee Gustafson
Lee Gustafson wrote
The pictures of Don Pacetti's HOn3 Como roundhouse on the C&Sn3 website, (they can be found on the first page under HOn3 Como layout photos) suggest a possible position of machine tools and belt routing. I found Don's work to be well thought out and executed very well.

Lee Gustafson

Lee,
Thanks so much for the compliments, but I just wanted to let everybody know that my layout has some fictional elements and assumes that the roundhouse machine shop was "re-installed and expanded" due to increased narrow gauge traffic precipitated by discovery of a fictional silver mine near Kenosha. I tried to be as correct as possible when it comes to what it would take to drive the machinery I chose to install, but it is fictional, nonetheless. I really wish I had Jeff's drawing when I started my roundhouse, but I don't feel too bad as my research indicates the machine shop heavy equipment was removed and the shop personnel furloughed / reassigned in 1908. The good news is it allowed me some modelers license in my machine shop layout. I will admit, that my imagined layout came pretty darn close to what Jeff has...sometimes it's better to be lucky, than it is to be good. =D
All the best, Don
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
If you go up to the west of town where the O'Neil ditch ran you can see where there was presumably a sluice gate that fed a ditch that arrowed in the direction of the Roundhouse.

I must have gone underground at some point as it would have run through many old building otherwise.

Does beg the issue what they did in the winter, the ditch would have been frozen.
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