Como Stationary Boiler

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Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
Where did the stationary boiler used in the Como Roundhouse toward the end of operations come from?What about its predecessors?
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
All I know is that when they replaced the original Boiler that had to knock down the wall as the door was not big enough to get it out. The current boarded hole was made by Cooley so I presume it was easier for him to knock through that area. Quite what the wall was like between the boiler room and the roundhouse during the railroad era I do not know.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
Pictures from the 30s(?)seem to show the smokebox protruding from the back wall ,with a tall smokestack and a locomotive style smokebox front.I think there's a photo of them trying to remove it.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
Begs the question how frequently it was replaced? Were they purpose built or recycled junk?
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Don Pacetti
Unfortunately, I could find no description or details of the boiler in the 1918 ICC Summary - Station Notes.  
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Jeff Ramsey
In reply to this post by ComoDepot
In the early years of the Como roundhouse in parnoramic images of Como in 1883-1884 prior to the years of the stone addition of the boiler house in 1885 it appears to be a vertical boiler in the  south west corner of the roundhouse.


In 1886 after the boiler house addition was construced there must have been a horizontal boiler but I think is would not have been from a old DSP&P locomotive boiler of as none DSP&P locos had been scrapped with exception of  the 9 but that boiler was destroyed in Utah on the U&N. I wonder about the CC 0-4-0s that were scrapped in 1879-1883? It could be possible that this fairly large boiler could be a old standard gauge locomotive boiler from the UP/KP or another possibility this was just a large, commercial stationary boiler that did not have locomotive ancestry. Also at this time the DSP&P had a boiler shop in West Denver and could have designed and constructed their own stationary boilers as also the D&RG did the same at the time. In the Mellon image of 1886 the boiler must have been fairly large and the diameter of the stack looks to me to be at least at least 24" in diameter and appears to be placed parralel to the back wall of the round house with the firebox on the south side and the smoke box to the north side.  All other boilers in the boiler house in its history of the Como  boiler house until 1938 paralleled  the back wall.


When the second boiler was placed in service is unknown but it was after 1886  but before 1896. This second boiler was most likely needed when the first wood additions was added to the roundhouse that were relocated or reclaimed engine houses from Platte Canon and Dickey and when the machine shop was expanded. This shop expansion occurred around 1893, same year as the DL&G West Denver roundhouse and machine shop were taken offline.



Multiple views in the 1897-1900 period show a larger diameter smoke stack that is  near the rear wall of the roundhouse, and is within 2-3 feet of the north wall of the boiler house and about 40' high.  A second smaller diameter stack is more center lined the house, is about 3-4 feet from the north wall and is about 30'high. Perhaps the reason that the 2 stacks are not even with the north wall is that so the back heads of the boilers are even as they were fired from the south end of the house. The door of the boiler house for the delivery of coal is almost centered on the south wall and is close to centerline of the second boiler.


The image taken in 1905 show to what appears to be a wagon top Mason Locomotive Works boiler that has been removed from the boiler house. DSP&P Mason locomotives with the smaller, wagon top boilers that were scrapped by 1893 were the 3,6,7,10,11,12 and 13. This type of boiler possibly was the second boiler with the smaller, shorter stack. It seems in the 1905 image that the first boiler might still be in use (with it's larger diameter) as the stack in the image is still intact.



Around the 1905 period it Is evident that both smoke stacks were replaced both stacks of the same diameter of around perhaps of 18' in diameter and both higher than their predecessors of around of a height of 55'-60' for the second boiler from the rear roundhouse wall and a height from around 50'-55' for the first and was set plumb as the stack leaned a little to the east. Were these newer, larger boilers or boiler  the reason for the removal of the original door and window on the south wall for the larger door and transom?



The Como Roundhouse Preservation timeline say that a new used locomotive boiler was installed in the boiler house in 1926. Photographic evident show that the boiler's smoke box an stack were on the outside of the north wall. Could this have been a longer standard gauge boiler or just a narrow gauge one? The diameter of this boilers smoke box suggests of a design of pre 1900 with a stack height of around 30'. Whether if both circa 1905 boilers survived till being replaced 1926 or in only one survived till then is unclear as after around 1920 10 of the 13 stalls of the roundhouse was removed and most of the machinery of the machine shop was removed by 1918. Were 2 boilers needed?



In the 1938 C&S bid for salvage contractors there was a wording that the remaining Como roundhouse boiler was not the property of the salvage company along with the almost new upper tank behind the roundhouse. In Fig. w ,taken in 1938 the upper tank has allready been removed and the boiler whose smokebox that extended through the north wall is in the process of being removed as it appears through the north wall. Notice the demolished masonary. Perhaps this dismantling  was done this way for the reason that it would have been easier loading on to a flat car out of town? Other interesting machinery notes include that in the late teen ICC accounting is that the horizontal duplex Knowles pump was "said to be the "property of the City of Como. This pump is listed to be resting on a concrete base. Could this be the only origiinal C&S machine tool foundation that remains today in the Como roundhouse? Was it for the generator? Or was it for some machinery in the Cooley Sawmill of the 1950s inside the former roundhouse?


Notice the last water tank has already been removed, 1938.


I don't think the half back wall of stall 1 of the roundhouse was removed by the railroad or of the salvage company for anything that had to do with the boiler and was not removed until after the boiler house was removed as the wall would have to been intact as the would have had to support the roof joists of the boiler house. Could have Cooley removed the boiler house because whoever removed the boiler  for salvage destroyed the north wall in the process an made a worthless structure and created access to their sawmill in the former roundhouse through the west roundhouse wall of stall 1?

Would it not be great if someday the Como boiler house was similarly replicated with a facsimile boiler as a exhibit or a prime mover for a recreated machine shop?









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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
What were they doing with DSP&P 1 "Fairplay"?
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Jeff Young
Great pictures, Jeff!  A bunch of them were new to me.

Interesting info, too.

Cheers,
(the other) Jeff
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

South Park
  Jeff R.,

  Is there a larger version of your second photo above ?  I really like the Congdon stack era.  Would like to see more of the scene.

  Is it just me, or does it seem odd to anyone else that a museum/tourist line has never been recreated on the South Park line from Como to Kenosha and back ?  It seems perfectly located for close access to metro Denver, a PERFECT setting with the historic Como structures, and the ROW and run remains unobstructed by development, highly visible to passersby, and so incredibly scenic.

"Duty above all else except Honor"
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
That's just an enlargement  of  the photo of the Como Roundhouse with the "group picture" of Cooke Consolidations.I think your idea of a recreated C&S line in South Park is something that needs to happen.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

South Park

  After years of listening to discussion over on the NGDF about ops issues with The Loop, C&TS, and D&S, it seems a tourist line from Como to Kenosha meets many, if not all of the criteria cited as important for the financial success of a tourist-oriented steam RR operation:

  1.  Easy access to central transportation routes/close in to population center.

  2.  ROW still available.  No serious development obstructions.

  3.  Scenery.  South Park is beautiful, view from Kenosha is breathtaking.

  4.  A heavy grade to "exercise" the motive power.

  5.  Historic buildings - Como, Jefferson.  The museum potential for Como and the roundhouse is like nowhere else.  Couple this with no serious representation of the DSP&P or successor lines exists anywhere, this seems an amazingly overlooked historic gem.

  6.  Reasonable length of train travel -  too short is bad.  Too long is also bad.

  7.  Back to point 5, a place to centrally locate South Park historical items and properly represent the railroad as the homegrown effort of Coloradans building for Colorado that it was.

  If anyone hs ever walked through the California RR Museum, it is not difficult to imagine what could be done with Como !

  I did a search for that Cooke consolidation photo, but could find nothing.  Help ?
"Duty above all else except Honor"
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
8. Grade crosses US 285 3 times.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
In reply to this post by South Park
The Roundhouse Consolidation photo is on p414 of Poors Memorial,among other places including Ted Kiersey.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Jeff Ramsey
In reply to this post by ComoDepot
Unfortunately the former grade is also used as a alignment for modern electric power poles.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
It seems like they did that on some of the grade between Parlin and Pitkin.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

South Park
  Well, grade crossings and some power poles are a whole lot easier to work
with than housing developments and industrial parks, which also don't give
back much in the way of scenery along the train ride.  
"Duty above all else except Honor"
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Jeff Ramsey
In reply to this post by South Park
Here is the full image of 1886

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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

South Park
  Thanks Jeff.  For some reason, I had it in my head that the tops of those two Congdon stacks were on locomotives on the lead-in track to the turntable and they were facing west, which did not ring any bells in my fuzzy memory.  But now I recognize the photo.

  Damn !  .....   South Park locos never looked as good as they did wearing those Congdon stacks !!!   ....  OK, the Ridgway and visored 18" Pyle-National headlight years were really great too.  But what a time ...  1880's South Park.  What I would do to have a month to explore that line in 1886 !  
"Duty above all else except Honor"
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

Robert McFarland
I'd rather go in Oct-Nov 1879 to see Weston,or sometime in 1880 to see the Baldwins,Big Masons,early Tiffanies,and Pullman cars.I'm more partial to Nesmiths,but it was Congdons that first attracted me to the South Park.Wouldn't there have been a significant number of engines converted to diamond stacks by 1886-plus less traffic?.It was a May1980 NG&SL Gazzete article  about re-gearing and detailing a Mason Bogie by Bruce Eaton and Garrie Tufford that got me interested in Nesmiths.
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Re: Como Stationary Boiler

ComoDepot
Never noticed there were windows in the doors. And I had told people that bay 1 was never used by Locomotives, obviously was at this time.

Looks like May/June? Warm enough outside but still snow in the trees above.
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